Author Archive

Update: The Maine Genealogist, Volumes 39-41

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History of York County, Maine; Internet Archive Book Images, No restrictions, via Wikimedia Commons

We are very happy to add volumes 39-41 (2017-2019) to The Maine Genealogist database. This update adds over 701 pages, 11,693 records, and 11,486 searchable names.

Published since 1977, The Maine Genealogist is the quarterly journal of Maine Genealogical Society, founded in 1976. Beginning as a newsletter for the society, the publication evolved into The Maine Seine, published until 1990. The title was changed to The Maine Genealogist in 1991, and each issue, now 48 pages, contains scholarly articles on Maine families, emphasizing the solving of long-standing problems and primary source documentation.

The indexing for these records includes full names, publication year (not the year of the record), and article titles and authors.

This update is made possible by the efforts of our volunteers David Anderson and Sam Sturgis. If you would like to get involved in the database digitization and indexing process, please contact Rachel Adams, Database Services Volunteer Coordinator, at rachel.adams@nehgs.org.

Please note: This database is available to all NEHGS members.

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Update: Old Stone Bank, 1844-1897, Volumes 26-29

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Page 18 of Volume 29

We are so excited to announce that the last four volumes of Providence, RI: Old Stone Bank Records, 1844-1897 are now up!

This database now contains all 29 volumes of signature books from the Old Stone Savings Bank. The additional 4 volumes contain 58,537 records, 157,940 names, and 761 pages from 1894-1897.

The Old Stone Bank of Providence, Rhode Island was founded in 1819, as The Providence Institution of Savings. Following the 1854 construction of the iconic domed building located at 86 South Main Street in Providence, it became known as the “Old Stone Bank,” and was officially renamed as the Old Stone Savings Bank in 1967. The institution operated under the name “Old Stone Savings Bank” until it was absorbed as a part of Citizens Bank in 1993, which subsequently donated the Old Stone Bank Savings Bank records to the Rhode Island Historical Society.

Many of the records pertain to immigrants to Providence. This is particularly valuable for Irish immigrants as the native county is provided which is critical information for additional research in Ireland. All records will be of type “Residence” for the location of Providence, Rhode Island and the surrounding communities. For more information regarding specifically Irish Immigrants appearing the Old Stone Bank records, check-out researcher Ray McKenna’s project, Federal Hill Irish, where he explores genealogical and regional connections from Providence to the Emerald Isle.

This database is the result of partnership with the Rhode Island Historical Society. The Rhode Island Historical Society has the original books for Old Stone Savings Bank. Additional context for the full collection at RIHS can be found here. RIHS has partnered with NEHGS to digitize and index these books and make them available online.

This database is made possible by the efforts of not only our NEHGS volunteers, but volunteers working with the Rhode Island Historical Society under the direction of Ray McKenna.  

We would like to extend our gratitude towards Ray’s team: Casey Zahn, David Adams, Donna Adkins, Heather Anderson, Karen Apple, Jamie Babcock, Holly Barrick, Donna Burgess, Marcia Carr-Carvalho, Michael Carragher, Greg Casey, Patty Crowley, Rosemary Danforth, Shawn Driscoll, Deborah Esborn, Beth Feltus, Susan Fougstedt, Susan L. Griffith, Jeff Hartley, Mike Kenyon, Kathy Kittredge, Stacy McCue, Jeff Poulton, Maria Tilford Hunter, and Helena Zurowski. Without their hard work, this project would not have been possible!

We would also like to thank the team of NEHGS volunteers who have also dedicated their time to this project: Sam Sturgis, Gale Stevenson, Mirca Sghedoni, Katherine Marshall-Mayer, Ross Weaver, and Eileen McCarthy. If you would like to become part of the team working on this or other rewarding genealogical projects, please contact Rachel Adams, Database Services Volunteer Coordinator via email at rachel.adams@nehgs.org.

Please note: This database is available to all NEHGS members, including Guest members, at no cost. Consider membership.

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American Ancestors Magazine, Volume 23

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Volume 23, Issue 1 Cover

Today we’ve added Volume 23 (2022) to our American Ancestors Magazine database. This update includes 264 pages, 2,838 records, and 2,689 searchable names.

The themes for each of the new issues are listed below:

23.1: The new AmericanAncestors.org: Expanding our reach
23.2: Gravestones and Genealogy
23.3: Avoiding Common Pitfalls in Family History Research
23.4: Reaching the Next Generation of Genealogists

The these records are indexed by full names, publication year (not the year of the record), article titles, and authors.

American Ancestors features a wide range of article topics and styles including coverage of a particular region or group of people; case studies; descriptions of particular record sets; “how-to” articles; historic accounts that illuminate the past; research strategies and methodology; and accounts of migration and immigrant groups.

We update this database once a year, when the entire volume of the magazine is complete.  If you would like to view online issues of current Volume 24, be sure to visit our publications page where you can view the newest issue.

Interested researchers may also want to consult New England Ancestors, the publication that preceded American Ancestors magazine.

The entire run of American Ancestors is available in our research library, call number F1.N49.

This update is made possible by the efforts of our volunteers David Anderson and Sam Sturgis. If you would like to get involved in the database indexing process, please contact Rachel Adams, Database Services Volunteer Coordinator, at rachel.adams@nehgs.org.

Please note: This database is available to Individual-level and above NEHGS members only. Consider Membership.

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New Database: Society of the Cincinnati in the State of Connecticut

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Statue of Captain Nathan Hale by Bela Lyon Pratt (statue), Christopher De Coro (photograph), Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

We are excited to announce a new database! Connecticut: Society of the Cincinnati.

This three-volume database, which was created from Biographies of Original Members and Qualifying Officers – Society of the Cincinnati in the State of Connecticut, edited by J. Michael Phelps, contains 715 fully cited genealogical and biographical sketches of all qualified propositi of the Connecticut Society of the Cincinnati, including renowned heroes such as Capt. Nathan Hale, Gen. Jedediah Huntington, Gen. Samuel Holden Parsons, Gen. Israel Putnam Sr., Maj. Benjamin Tallmadge, and Gen. David Wooster. These sketches contain 36,049 records and 35,831 names.

In May 1783, as the Revolutionary War was nearing its end, the Society of the Cincinnati was formed by its officers, some of whom had served together for as long as eight years, as a way for them to maintain their friendships and provide for their widows and orphans. The Society was named for Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus, a Roman general who had left his farm and family to fight for his country, as did George Washington centuries later. It includes all Original Members and all who qualify under some other basis of the original or amended Institution, including, but not limited to, Died in Service, Rule of 1854, Deranged (retired by consolidation), or Served to End of War.

The volumes are divided as follows:

Volume 1: Thomas Abbe – Cornelius Higgins

Volume 2: Joseph Higgins – Samuel Sanford

Volume 3: Abijah Savage – John Yates/Yeats

We are grateful to our volunteers, David Anderson and Sam Sturgis, for their help in making this database.

Please note: This database is available to Individual-level and above NEHGS members only. Consider membership.

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Update: Providence, Rhode Island: Old Stone Bank Records, 1844-1897

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Kenneth C. Zirkel, CC BY-SA 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

We are happy to announce that the next five volumes of Providence, RI: Old Stone Bank Records, 1844-1897 are now up!

This database now contains the first 25 volumes of signature books from the Old Stone Savings Bank. When complete, the database will contain all 29 Signature books. The additional five volumes contain 81,846 records, 220,804 names, and 1,047 pages from 1893-1894.

The Old Stone Bank of Providence, Rhode Island was founded in 1819, as The Providence Institution of Savings. Following the 1854 construction of the iconic domed building located at 86 South Main Street in Providence, it became known as the “Old Stone Bank,” and was officially renamed as the Old Stone Savings Bank in 1967. The institution operated under the name “Old Stone Savings Bank” until it was absorbed as a part of Citizens Bank in 1993, which subsequently donated the Old Stone Bank Savings Bank records to the Rhode Island Historical Society.

Many of the records pertain to immigrants to Providence. This is particularly valuable for Irish immigrants as the native county is provided which is critical information for additional research in Ireland. All records will be of type “Residence” for the location of Providence, Rhode Island and the surrounding communities. For more information regarding specifically Irish Immigrants appearing the Old Stone Bank records, check-out researcher Ray McKenna’s project, Federal Hill Irish, where he explores genealogical and regional connections from Providence to the Emerald Isle.

This database is the result of partnership with the Rhode Island Historical Society. The Rhode Island Historical Society has the original books for Old Stone Savings Bank. Additional context for the full collection at RIHS can be found here. RIHS has partnered with NEHGS to digitize and index these books and make them available online.

This database is made possible by the efforts of not only our NEHGS volunteers, but volunteers working with the Rhode Island Historical Society under the direction of Ray McKenna.  

We would like to extend our gratitude towards Ray’s team: Casey Zahn, David Adams, Donna Adkins, Heather Anderson, Karen Apple, Jamie Babcock, Holly Barrick, Donna Burgess, Marcia Carr-Carvalho, Michael Carragher, Greg Casey, Patty Crowley, Rosemary Danforth, Shawn Driscoll, Deborah Esborn, Beth Feltus, Susan Fougstedt, Susan L. Griffith, Jeff Hartley, Mike Kenyon, Kathy Kittredge, Stacy McCue, Jeff Poulton, Maria Tilford Hunter, and Helena Zurowski. Without their hard work, this project would not have been possible!

We would also like to thank the team of NEHGS volunteers who have also dedicated their time to this project: Sam Sturgis, Gale Stevenson, Mirca Sghedoni, Katherine Marshall-Mayer, Ross Weaver, and Eileen McCarthy. If you would like to become part of the team working on this or other rewarding genealogical projects, please contact Rachel Adams, Database Services Volunteer Coordinator via email at rachel.adams@nehgs.org.

Please note: This database is available to all NEHGS members, including Guest members, at no cost. Consider membership.

Read more »

Update: Providence, Rhode Island: Old Stone Bank Records, 1844-1897

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Old Stone Bank, South Main St, Providence RI. Kenneth C. Zirkel, CC BY-SA 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

We are happy to announce that the next ten volumes of records of Providence, RI: Old Stone Bank Records, 1844-1897 are now up!

This database now contains the first 20 volumes of signature books from the Old Stone Savings Bank. When complete, the database will contain all 29 Signature books. The additional 10 volumes contain 191,989 records, 368,998 names, and 3,732 pages from 1890-1894.

The Old Stone Bank of Providence, Rhode Island was founded in 1819, as The Providence Institution of Savings. Following the 1854 construction of the iconic domed building located at 86 South Main Street in Providence, it became known as the “Old Stone Bank,” and was officially renamed as the Old Stone Savings Bank in 1967. The institution operated under the name “Old Stone Savings Bank” until it was absorbed as a part of Citizens Bank in 1993, which subsequently donated the Old Stone Bank Savings Bank records to the Rhode Island Historical Society.

Many of the records pertain to immigrants to Providence. This is particularly valuable for Irish immigrants as the native county is provided which is critical information for additional research in Ireland. All records will be of type “Residence” for the location of Providence, Rhode Island and the surrounding communities. For more information regarding specifically Irish Immigrants appearing the Old Stone Bank records, check-out researcher Ray McKenna’s project, Federal Hill Irish, where he explores genealogical and regional connections from Providence to the Emerald Isle.

This database is the result of partnership with the Rhode Island Historical Society. The Rhode Island Historical Society has the original books for Old Stone Savings Bank. Additional context for the full collection at RIHS can be found here. RIHS has partnered with NEHGS to digitize and index these books and make them available online.

This database is made possible by the efforts of not only our NEHGS volunteers, but volunteers working with the Rhode Island Historical Society under the direction of Ray McKenna.  

We would like to extend our gratitude towards Ray’s team: Casey Zahn, David Adams, Donna Adkins, Heather Anderson, Karen Apple, Jamie Babcock, Holly Barrick, Donna Burgess, Marcia Carr-Carvalho, Michael Carragher, Greg Casey, Patty Crowley, Rosemary Danforth, Shawn Driscoll, Deborah Esborn, Beth Feltus, Susan Fougstedt, Susan L. Griffith, Jeff Hartley, Mike Kenyon, Kathy Kittredge, Stacy McCue, Jeff Poulton, Maria Tilford Hunter, and Helena Zurowski. Without their hard work, this project would not have been possible!

We would also like to thank the team of NEHGS volunteers who have also dedicated their time to this project: Sam Sturgis, Gale Stevenson, Mirca Sghedoni, Katherine Marshall-Mayer, Ross Weaver, and Eileen McCarthy. If you would like to become part of the team working on this or other rewarding genealogical projects, please contact Rachel Adams, Database Services Volunteer Coordinator via email at rachel.adams@nehgs.org.

Please note: This database is available to all NEHGS members, including Guest members, at no cost. Consider membership.

Read more »

Ireland: The Annals of Beara, Volume Three

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Tourists motoring past Tunnel Cottage or Long Tunnel Cottage, Glengariff, Co. Cork. National Library of Ireland on The Commons, No restrictions, via Wikimedia Commons

We are excited to announce that the third indexed volume of Ireland: The Annals of Beara has been added to its database, adding 50,069 records and 49,391 names!

Riobard O’Dwyer published this three-volume study of the families of the Beara Peninsula (West Cork, Ireland) in 2009. The work contains information on families from the parishes of Adrigole and Allihies (in Volume 1); Bere Island and Eyeries (in Volume 2); and Castletownbere and Glengarriff (in Volume 3). Volume 3 also contains a brief history of the O’Sullivan clan.

The family records range in date from 1776 to 1992, with the majority of records in the period 1822-1956. Many of the families and descendants are traced from their origins in Beara to the United States and other countries.

This database is now indexed for all three volumes. Tables of contents for all three volumes may be downloaded to help locate the volumes and pages for specific towns and parishes in Beara. The NEHGS Library also holds the research papers of Riobard O’Dwyer in its Special Collections, call number Mss 1097.

Special thanks to Sam Sturgis for his help implementing this update!

Please note: This database is available to Individual-level and above NEHGS members only. Consider membership.

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New Transcription Challenge!

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(Photo by Anna, CC BY 2.0 httpscreativecommons.orglicensesby2.0, via Wikimedia Commons)

Thank you to everyone who participated in the last Transcription Challenge! The next set of challenges are also from the Old Stone Bank in Providence, Rhode Island and it includes an entry that could be a location, an occupation, or something else! You can participate by going to the “Transcription Challenge” tab at the top of the page and submitting your suggestions in the comments.

After going through every response, we have settle on:

1. Leon Jambard

2. Weissac (Weissach), Prussia

3. Waterloo, C.E. (Quebec)

4a. Francesco Giambastiani

4b. Wiehe

5. Draw Filer

6. Maria A. Sharket

We appreciate everyone’s help and are excited to see the suggestions for the next set of challenges!

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New Transcription Challenge!

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(Photo by Anna, CC BY 2.0 httpscreativecommons.orglicensesby2.0, via Wikimedia Commons)

Thank you to everyone who participated in the last Transcription Challenge! We had 70 responses and 60 of them were in just the first two days! The research and suggestions were so helpful and we loved reading about some of Rhode Island’s history, such as Rumford Chemical Works, which made Rumford Baking Powder, and this fascinating article about Waldo and Emma Barnes! https://warwickonline.com/stories/back-in-the-day-the-story-of-the-dead-horse-man,152750

The next set of challenges are also from the Old Stone Bank in Providence, Rhode Island and it includes names, occupations, and locations. You can participate by going to the “Transcription Challenge” tab at the top of the page and submitting your suggestions in the comments.

After going through every response, we have settle on:

1a. Tattrie

1b. Gilder

2a. book agent

2b. Rumford Chem. Wks., Rumford Chemical Works

3. Clerk in iron store on Canal St.

4. tentmaker

5. Co. Westmeath

6a. Laborer at church, works on farm

6b. Stucco worker

We appreciate everyone’s help and are excited to see the suggestions for the next set of challenges!

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New Transcription Challenge!

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(Photo by Anna, CC BY 2.0 httpscreativecommons.orglicensesby2.0, via Wikimedia Commons)

Thank you to everyone who participated in the last Transcription Challenge! Everyone provided helpful feedback and suggestions! To change things up for the new set of challenges, we have added some occupations and locations! You can participate by going to the “Transcription Challenge” tab at the top of the page and submitting your suggestions in the comments.

It is always really interesting and helpful to see how everyone transcribes this tricky handwriting! After going through every response, the names we have settled on are:

1. Henihan

2. McGuert, McGuerty

3. Julla, Julia

4. Harrison

5. Thersir, Tessier

6. Thomas

We appreciate everyone’s help and are excited to see the suggestions for the next set of challenges!

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